I am Peter Breuls. I write web applications in PHP, movie reviews and irregularly something on this weblog. Welcome!
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I work as an Administrator at online community FOK! and as a Lead Developer at frontoffice supplier SIMgroep.

A day at the RAI: Dutch PHP Conference 2008

Tech / Web development / Internet / PHP1 comment

I like conferences. They bring a combination of information, context, some discussion and all kinds of impressions to you in audible form. In a form that doesn't require you to browse through blogs or magazine articles. Also, you can reflect on the subjects with others during the break times. Or just reflect on it by yourself. In some way, it differs from just reading about the topics on weblogs or online manuals, it's got a different vibe. One I like.

So last weekend I went to the Dutch PHP Conference. I went last year, and I liked it, so attending this year's edition seems logical. But after a day of listening to some interesting talks I'm wondering: who is the indented audience for this conference? Am I even in it?

Let me explain by walking through the day. After @ijansch's opening, we were welcomed into the history of PHP by Zeev Suraski, one of the founders of Zend and with that, one of the people who made PHP what it is today. It's nice to hear the story from someone first-hand, as opposed to reading it in the PHP Manual.

He gave his view on PHP today: it's mostly done, and our focus as a community has been, and still is, shifting to frameworks. In a way that's like saying "we've been building the car for a few years, now it has become time to do some driving". And he's right. PHP is never truly done, of course, but it is fairly done, and now it's up to the frameworks to mature and become the highly useful, production-ready toolkits we all need (yes, need, even though some of us might not know it yet). In my view: some parts of frameworks wille eventually become more attached to the core of PHP, as often-used parts will grow into the extensions area.

After Zeev, Marco Tabini, publisher of php|architect (which I'm subscribed to), explained how important mayo is to the PHP world. No, wait, that wasn't it. He wasn't very PHP-specific, but his keynote was quite interesting nevertheless.

Lunch came and went, and the breakout sessions started. I attended the ones presented by Gaylord Aulke, Lorna Jane Mitchell and Ivo Jansch.

Gaylord talked about how you would go about creating, maintaining and using an infrastructure when you're working in a team. He explained about development locations, version control management, test- and staging servers and deploying your work to a live server. This very much connected with Lorna's talk, which focused on deployment in general, and on doing that with subversion in particular.

Both talks were interesting, but only small bits of it were giving me new information or a perspective I didn't think of before. Both gave me the impression that the intended audience would not include people already working in teams, with version control already very much in place and several live projects to maintain. Those people would already have invented (and/or implemented) the proverbial wheel for their own situation. Which is the case for me: at both of my jobs, an infrastructure is in place and working nicely. Nevertheless, both talks were interesting, and some viewpoints offered, along with a nice feeling of confirmation, some food for though and/or Googling.

After the break, the choice was to be made between Stefan Priebsch's session on the upcoming PHP releases, a session by Matthew Weier O'Phinney about best practices within Zend Framework (this description is not as accurate as it should be, but we'll get to that) and Ivo Jansch's presentation about Enterprise PHP.

Because information about PHP 5.3 and 6 can be found on the mailing list, wiki pages, blogs and the slides Stefan posted before the conference, that one was an easy choice: no need to attend. The session on Best practices within Zend Framework would only make sense if you were actively using ZF, I thought, so that would not be very practical at this very moment (I was wrong, as you can see by reading the actual description on the site, it's not 'within' Zend Framework, but 'inspired by' it, if I understand correctly). So I entered the room in which I would be very cautious about product placement (kidding).

Ivo's session had 'Enterprise PHP Development' as its title. Because I work in a couple of teams/environments where the label 'enterprise' might, in some way, be a suitable one, I thought I'd attend this session. It's always nice to get some tips, attention points and such. But, the session was basically about the same as Gaylord's and Lorna's. Not that he covered the same topics, but again I felt like I knew a lot of it already. He covered ten main points you need to be thoughtful of when working on your projects, of which some were very obvious, and others inspired some thinking while in itself not being new (to me, at least).

After all this, my colleagues and me were interviewed for a Bachelor ICT video, in which we expressed our concerns about the lack of depth in the sessions. Terry Chay had already started his keynote by that time, so after missing the beginning, we hurried in and stood in the back, while listening to a very interesting and nice keynote. Chay is a wise man, I said to myself.

Looking back at the day in its entirety, I think I expected more. I already called my feeling about the sessions a 'lack of depth'. This of course isn't necessarily a bad thing. A PHP Conference, especially one in a community that's still growing and has a lot of people still learning how to be the best, should be aiming for a wide audience and not exclude beginners. However, if some f the sessions would last longer, maybe the contents could become more hands-on and give you more the feeling you're walking away with lots of information to research in the days or weeks after the conference.

I'll probably attend next year's edition, but can I silently hope for some more advanced content?